Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

MUSIC

Musicians have more connected brains than non-musicians

Compared to non-musicians, both types of musicians had stronger functional connectivity — the synchronized activity of brain regions — in the auditory regions of both brain hemispheres.

Photo by Clark Young from Unsplash.com

The brains of musicians have stronger structural and functional connections compared to those of non-musicians, regardless of innate pitch ability, according to new research from JNeurosci.

Years of musical training shape the brain in dramatic ways. A minority of musicians — with Mozart and Michael Jackson in their ranks — also possess absolute pitch, the ability to identify a tone without a reference. But, it remains unclear how this ability impacts the brain.

In the biggest sample to date, Leipold et al. compared the brains of professional musicians, some with absolute pitch and some without, to non-musicians. To the team’s surprise, there were no strong differences between the brains of musicians with and without absolute pitch ability; instead absolute pitch may shape the brain in more subtle ways.

Compared to non-musicians, both types of musicians had stronger functional connectivity — the synchronized activity of brain regions — in the auditory regions of both brain hemispheres.

Musicians also had stronger white matter connections between auditory regions and lobes involved in various types of high-level processing.

Musicians that began their training at a younger age had stronger structural connections than musicians with a later start.

These results demonstrate how experience shapes the brain, especially early in life, and how enhanced musical skills are represented in our brain.

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

READ:  PPO, violinist Chino Gutierrez bring holiday cheers
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Like Us On Facebook

You May Also Like

Alternative Sounds

Garage-psych chameleon Chris Jack returns once again with a new album from his band, The Routes, and premieres the video for the title track....

MUSIC

Despite no obvious biological benefits, humans love music. Neuroimaging studies highlight similarities between how the brain's reward circuits process music and other rewards like...

MUSIC

GRAMMY Award-winning multi-platinum band Maroon 5 debuted the music video for latest hit single “Beautiful Mistakes” featuring Megan Thee Stallion.

MUSIC

Musically trained children perform better at attention and memory recall and have greater activation in brain regions related to attention control and auditory encoding,...

Advertisement